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Gardening 2022

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We have pollinators in residence:

Screen Shot 2022-05-25 at 8.05.28 PM.png Screen Shot 2022-05-25 at 8.05.38 PM.png

 

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I got everything in the ground, with the exception of one section of raised bed, which will be reserved for more corn. But I want to stagger the plantings out a couple weeks apart so we get fresh corn over the course of a few weeks. 

We planted 12 pepper plants, six of them purple peppers, and sex of them yellow. Also put in pumpkins, zucchini, and some cukes for making pickles I think. And of course a whole lot of Yukon Gold spuds. 

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Posted (edited)

I have hilled the taters twice and they are too big now to do it again so now it just side dressing them . I’m thinking thats a job better left for the cooler day ! 
The raised beds are doing great , maters have blossomed and will need pinching off shortly Kale … yes Kale is looking awesome , beets , Snow peas and my one Eggplant all going . In the Winter squash patch ( hail Mary pass here ) Butternut are sending runners out and the one Italian plant going gangbusters . Now i need to explain the Hail Mary pass comment . The squash are planted directly under a patch of Black Walnut trees , which everyone say’s  “ nuthin will grow there “ as the nuts dropping makes the soil toxic . Of course me having to fly in the face of the “ experts “ I test the soils and visually can see all the good stuff in what I till up , so in the plants went LOL . Guess I really didn’t need that two year course in Horticulture! 

Edited by Hal
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I stirred the compost bins today and whew baby was it steaming hot!

Our harden is officially in. No beans this year, but a lot of corn, some cukes for pickles and a bunch of sunflowers because, why not?

Im also working on my skills at trimming basil plants to keep them full and bushy instead of tall and stalky. So far so good.

 

 

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Across the road there's a huge pile of composted hay and shavings with chicken and goat manure mixed in. It's broken down nicely so I brought some over and top dressed the blueberry bushes with it. I'm guessing it's not too acidic and I can mix it in to the garden beds this Fall, but I want to wait and test it to make sure.  

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It's been so dry and things aren't looking good in the garden. I water it from the spigot, two watering cans at a time. But even then, I have to be careful because we're on a well. There's been drier summers, 2016 being the worst, and even then we never ran the well dry but I don't want to take a chance. I might be able to haul water from the creek, I have to see if I can find a spot where I can get the wagon to. 
 
If this keeps up I may have to start writing off certain plants for the sake of others.

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3 hours ago, Chris said:

She's pretty dried up at this point, the one along the yard anyway. And the one across the road is extremely low. 

That would be a problem then. 

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1 hour ago, Kevin said:

That would be a problem then. 

Yeah I’m gonna walk the creek and see if there’s a hole I can access with the four wheeler and wagon to haul water from. If not, I may just start pulling stuff up and be thankful I don’t have to rely on it for winter.

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At this point, a garden is a waste of time and water. The cukes are struggling, there's two rows of corn that are not just shriveled but now drying out completely. All this despite my efforts to keep them watered, so I think it's time to yank them and try again next year. The potato plants are flopping over now so I think I'm gonna pull them as well. They go in early and I generally harvest them in early August anyway. So I should have at least some small crop of something there to eat this winter. 

At this point all water resources will just go to what I can salvage, including the three new blueberry plants I put in. Those cost a lot more to replace than a couple rows of corn. 

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And of course if poured yesterday, so we'll see what happens I guess. I think the potatoes are ready to pull either way. 

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5 minutes ago, Chris said:

And of course if poured yesterday, so we'll see what happens I guess. I think the potatoes are ready to pull either way. 

Nice you got pouring rain in your area! We got maybe a few little drops and that was it. Not even enough to wet the dust...

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If you are planning on planting garlic this fall you will want to start getting some sed cloves. They go in the ground in the next month or so.  Remember they aren't harvested till July so you won't be able to plant anything else in that location in the spring and they take all the nutrients from the soil anyway so you need to plant something next summer in that location that adds nutrients back.

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How would they do in an elevated box? Or does it need to be in the actual ground where it can’t freeze?

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They are only planted a inch below ground. I think they would do good in an elevated box. Just make sure to provide plenty of fertilizer or nutrients since they drain the soil of it.  

I have some cloves I will drop by your house in the next couple week. A few different varieties. I had them separated, but they all got mixed together. 

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Thanks! 

I'll likely get a bag of compost ( already screened and ready to use, unlike my bins ) and that will give it a good shot of nutrients. 

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This year's garden was perhaps the worst year ever. I did pick some corn, albeit stunted and small ears, to see if we can at least get a meal out of it. We've got just two smaller pumpkins on the vines. The peppers were 50/50. The purple ones are stunted and/or have blossom end rot, and the yellow ones came out orange, but did produce. They're a little tangier than the typical green sweet pepper, but not too bad. 

A couple weeks ago the wind took out one of our apple trees, not that they're producing this year. 

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8 hours ago, Chris said:

and the yellow ones came out orange, but did produce. They're a little tangier than the typical green sweet pepper, but not too bad. 

Just had one in an omelette… they were really good yeah a little tangy but great flavor ! 

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I give up on watermelons and pumpkins, I never get a good harvest from them.

As for the only other thing I grew my peppers did great. I have everything from sweet to ghost peppers and for the most part they all produced. I have a big bush of Thai peppers and even have 4-6 plants of Habanadas growing. Habanada looks, tastes and smells like a Habanero but with no eat.  So they should be interesting. 

Just threw out about 75 cloves of garlic because my basement got flooded and the excess moisture caused 1/2 of them to sprout and the other 1/2 was mushy. 

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I need some information from someone that has grown horseradish before.

I know they say to harvest in Oct-Nov, but should I wait till after a good frost kills the top of the plant? 

I have never grown it before, so any advice is appreciated. 

I did put it in a few buckets to keep it from taking over my yard.

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Just this thought Kevin . Horseradish being in the same family ( other than being a perennial) as Parsnips , Carrots , Turnip etc , these root vegetables get sweeter and more flavorful after a frost as the frost “ sets “ the sugars . My father used to dig it up after a frost .

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Me again Kevin . From a reference book that I keep on hand when i forget what i learned in school or what i learned from the man with big shoes (father ). 
 

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If I've learned anything this year, it's that basil does great outdoors but bring it indoors and it goes to hell in a hurry. Even with a good grow light. 

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